Bike Master Plan

About

The city is in the process of updating the bike master plan. The plan is a road map to develop our bike infrastructure from where it is right now to where we want it to be. The plan includes specific recommendations and priorities.

View the Bike Master Plan Draft

Presentation and Approval Timeline:

The Bicycle Master Plan will be presented before several committees and boards before final presentation to City Council for approval in 2018. All of these meetings are open to the public and offer further opportunities for feedback.

Vision

The Bike Master Plan envisions a healthy and vibrant Colorado Springs where bicycling is one of many transportation options for a large portion of the population, and where a well-connected and well-maintained network of urban trails, singletrack, and on-street infrastructure offers a bicycling experience for present and future generations that is safe, convenient, and fun for getting around, getting in shape, or getting away.

    Goals

    Safety

    Create a safe bicycling environment for people of all ages and bicycling abilities by implementing appropriate, state-of-the-art infrastructure on-street and off-street, including intersections and connections, and bolstering safety-related programs. As a City agency, embrace a safe systems approach and use it to approach all street projects.

    Viability

    Prioritize funding for bicycle infrastructure. Strategically phase infrastructure improvements to reflect realistic constraints and build momentum for the long-term vision.

    Integration

    Create a connected and cohesive network of low-stress and comfortable bicycle facilities linking key destinations and modes of travel. Create a culture of bicycling where everyday people ride, where riding is fun, and bicycling is an accepted form of transportation.

    Accessibility

    Create a community where bicycling is for all types of trips and includes people of ages, races, incomes, and bicycling ability. Create conveniently-accessed bicycle facilities that are easy and clear to use.

    Ridership

    Increase the portion of the population that regularly rides a bicycle for recreation and/or transportation. Achieving this goal is a key outcome of achieving every other stated goal.

    Why is the City of Colorado Springs addressing bicycling needs?

    Providing citizens with the facilities that they require to get where they need to go safely is a core function of local government. This should apply for all citizens, regardless of their chosen mode of transportation. Colorado Springs Council recognized this in 2005 when they passed a Complete Streets ordinance, saying that all streets should be designed and constructed to accommodate all users (calling out pedestrians, bicycle riders and transit users specifically). 

    People on bicycles are legally permitted to ride on all roadways except those that specifically exclude them. Being permitted to ride is very different from feeling safe and comfortable doing so. Repeatedly our citizens rank better multi-modal transportation options as of high importance for them when thinking about the city’s future.

    Crowd of bikers standing in front of fountain at America the Beautiful Park on bike to work day 2016.Colorado Springs has a vibrant bicycling culture. However, the current level of bike infrastructure does not accommodate the range of users who want/need to bicycle. Many people don’t feel comfortable using existing infrastructure or are frustrated by the limited connectivity between bicycle facilities. We need to create a safe connected network that will match the level of demand for bicycle infrastructure in Colorado Springs.

    Colorado Springs has also evolved as a destination city for outdoor activities and embodies an active lifestyle. Bicycling has become increasingly recognized as a strong economic driver that attracts and maintains a strong workforce and is a mainstream solution to everything from traffic congestion to air quality to obesity to a key factor in creating vibrant cities.

    Process

    What's Next?

    • Policy and Programmatic recommendations:  through mid-April, 2017
    • Implementation & Investment recommendations: mid-February to mid-May 2017
    • Performance measures: April/May 2017
    • Draft plan available for viewing and public comment: November-December 2017
    • Final plan to Council: April 2017

    Previous

    2016

    Contract signed with Toole Design Group (TDG) after Request For Proposal (RFP) process (started in late 2015).

    • TDG gathered all required data for analysis including Geographic Information System (GIS) data layers, feedback collected through other efforts, and documented policies and procedures.
    • TDG conducted a visioning workshop with stakeholders in June 2016, and met with the public at the Deerfield Hills block party and at a Legacy Loop Plaza/trailhead gathering in July 2016.
    • Based on previous efforts and input gathered at the workshop and public events, TDG drafted a vision, goals and objectives for the Colorado Springs Bike Master Plan.
    • Using input gathered from the community and earlier efforts, GIS data of existing and planned facilities, crash locations, destination information, TDG drafted an existing conditions report, The State of Bicycling in Colorado Springs
    • The contract is for $149,936.82, which is funded through the City’s General Fund budget.

    2015

    Public Works staff for the City of Colorado Springs begins the process to update the Bicycle Master Plan. They conducted public meetings in the four quadrants of the City to gather input, identify barriers and draft a vision statement. The resulting feedback, input and vision statement were also used in the current Master Plan efforts.

     

    July 2015

    PPACG Regional Nonmotorized Transportation System Plan approved by their Board of Directors.

    The consultants on the RNMP included extensive outreach through a variety of modes. The resulting feedback and input gave a good foundation to the City’s Master Plan efforts.

    FAQs & Bike Facts

    FAQs

    What will the Bike Master Plan include? What will it not include? 

    The Bike Master Plan document will include specific actions for the City to take to improve bicycling. These will fall into three primary categories: Programs, Policies, and Bicycle Network. The Plan will include a citywide bicycle network map (the Vision Network), identifying where bike facilities are most needed. Though the Plan will not include specific recommendations for bicycle facility types on a block-by-block basis, it will include technical decision-making guidance so that those details can be determined later, once projects are ready to be built. 

    We have a great trail network. Why do we need on-street bike facilities? 

    Despite the extensive trail system already developed in Colorado Springs and plans for its expansion, the greatest opportunity for developing a connected network of comfortable bicycle facilities is by supplementing it with on-street facilities such as bike boulevards, bike lanes, and separated bike lanes. Trails are typically costly and complex to build, whereas on-street facilities can be less expensive and can have fewer impacts, depending on the context. The combination of these types of facilities can ensure that Colorado Springs residents can seamlessly bike to recreation, work, and other destinations.  

    Why should the City spend taxpayer money on bike lanes when there are other needs? 

    Providing citizens with the facilities that they require to get where they need to go safely is a core function of local government. This applies to all citizens, regardless of their chosen mode of transportation. Additionally, investing in bicycling infrastructure is a good public investment. For each dollar invested in bicycling, the Pikes Peak Region can expect $1.80 to $2.70 in direct economic benefits to the community. Today, roughly 2.5 million car trips are made each day in the Pikes Peak Region. Converting even a small fraction of those to bike trips would alleviate some wear and tear on our streets, thereby reducing the need for costly repairs. 

    How will my neighborhood be impacted? 

    The Bike Master Plan will identify opportunities to increase neighborhood accessibility and livability through the development of a connected, comfortable bicycle network. A potential recommendation of the Plan is to conduct a survey of neighborhoods to gauge interest and support for implementation, results that will help the City prioritize areas to invest in first. Neighborhoods leaders in your community can be liaisons for communicating with the City about new bicycle projects, safety concerns, and implementation processes. 

    Bike Facts

    Bicycling fuels the economy

    The bicycle industry contributes $1 Billion to Colorado’s economy every year.

    Regular bicycle commuters who ride 5 miles to work can save about $500 per year on fuel and more than $1,000 on other expenses related to driving.  Research shows that customers who bicycle to a store typically buy less in a single visit than people  who drive, but they return more often and spend more overall per month.

    Bicycling has become increasingly recognized as a strong economic driver that attracts and maintains a strong workforce and is a mainstream solution to everything from traffic congestion to air quality to obesity to a key factor in creating vibrant cities.

    Bicycle facilities are a good public investment

    For each dollar invested in bicycling, the Pikes Peak Region could expect $1.80 to $2.70 in direct economic benefits to the community.
     
    Two-and-a-half million car trips are made each day in the Pikes Peak Region. Converting even a small fraction of these to bicycle trips would result in reduced pavement repair and maintenance costs.

    A 2009 nationwide study by CEOs for Cities found that houses in more walkable and bikable areas are worth up to $34,000 more than similar houses in other areas.
     

    Bicycling improves quality of life

    Americans want more travel choices: in 2010, two-thirds of people polled said they want more walking and bicycling choices to get around their community.

    Improving bicycling will help Colorado Springs residents enjoy more of what makes Colorado uniquely beautiful–the sun and Rocky Mountains. 

    Bicycling helps people become and stay healthy

    The Center for Disease Control has found that investments in bicycle infrastructure are more cost-effective than traditional preventive strategies in reducing obesity, chronic diseases and improving.

    As more people ride bicycles on our streets, awareness of bicyclists increases, improving safety for everyone. Research has shown that higher levels of bicycling  in a community are associated with a reduction in fatal crash rates. 

    Public Outreach

    • Initial phases of the project leaned heavily on existing feedback gathered through recent plan processes (See "Process" tab)
    • A Technical Advisory Committee (TAC), including representatives of City departments/divisions such as Engineering, Finance, Parks, Planning, Police, Transit and others from Pikes Peak Area Council of Governments (PPACG), El Paso County and Colorado Department of Transportation (CDOT), was formed to help guide the direction of the Bike Master Plan and review project deliverables.
      • Meeting 1: June 23, 2016
      • Meeting 2: January 26, 2017
      • Meetings 2 & 3: TBD, Spring & Summer 2017
    • The project team has a presence at four local community events to gather input from people who would not typically attend a public meeting.
      • Event 1: Deerfield Hills block party, July 29, 2016
      • Event 2: Legacy Loop Plaza/Trailhead gathering, July 29, 2016
      • Events 2 & 3: TBD, Spring & Summer 2017
    • The project team conducted a Visioning Workshop with Stakeholders on June 23, 2016.
    • The project team will conduct a public meeting or open house to share preliminary recommendations with the public.

    Materials Library